Scrap You Later

Childhood Scrap Stories with Tom

July 09, 2021 iScrap App Episode 46
Scrap You Later
Childhood Scrap Stories with Tom
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Scrap You Later
Childhood Scrap Stories with Tom
Jul 09, 2021 Episode 46
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Tom Buechel:

Welcome to this episode of Scrap You Later, a podcast made by scrappers for scrappers to answer your scrap metal related questions. Every week we'll be talking about things from prices to scrap metal stories, and we'll have metal guides and updates on the markets. We want to hear from you. So if you have questions that you want us to discuss, things you want to learn about Scrap You Later is here to teach you more about scrap. Hey, scrappers, it's Tom from the iScrap App, and in this episode of Scrap You Later, I want to tell you some childhood stories that I have that I remember down here at the scrap yard. Now, first and foremost, if you do not follow us, make sure that you follow our podcast Scrap You Later on Spotify, and through Apple. This way, you can always know when the most current episodes are coming, you'll get notifications, and I'll just help you continue to learn more about the scrap market and then make more money with your scrap. So I want to tell a few little stories that I remember from years and years ago, you know, my dad started the company back in 1977, Rockaway Recycling. And when we started back then, you know, was really just a one man band. And my first memories were in the early 90s, I was six or seven years old. And the first thing one of the first jobs I was given was sweeper. And my dad handed me a broom and told me all right, start sweeping. And I said, Well, why am I doing this, I said, Well, you can't have trip hazards, you can't have things on the floor, we don't want to lose material. And with all the other garbage, we don't want material to get mixed in with other pieces of dirt that kind of get mixed together. And he just showed me that starting at the bottom where some people think that sweeping is one of the worst jobs. And what sweeping does is it clears all the pathways for everything else. And it was really one of the most early memories that I have into a safety view, where to this day, one of the most important things that we talk about still at Rockaway Recycling, is keeping your runways clean, keeping all of the road that you're working on clean. And by using that sweeping talent that I was able to do, I've been able to show people how to sweep properly. I know it sounds funny, but some of you are probably sitting here saying to yourselves, yes, some people don't know how to sweep, you know, I've seen people pull the broom towards them, it doesn't work that way you push with the broom. And then when you need to get things together, then you're able to use a shovel, pick up all those debris, separate the metal and on with your day you went and that was that was one of my first jobs down here at Rockaway Recycling. And one of the first things that I really remember. So that was really cool. And to this day, it's just continued. I mean, we have 10-15 brooms all over the shop hanging so people can always clean. And one of the next things I remember was our parking lot used to be all types of, you know, broken asphalt, traditional scrap yard where once upon a time, it was smooth. But you know, over the years and years, you have potholes and dirt and debris, and everything else just happened, right. But I remember going through the back door of the scrap yard, and there was this big pile of bricks and there were these old gray bricks. And I didn't know what they were in. And of course, being a six or seven year old kid, I believe that my mom and dad were in the office doing some accounting work. And I was just kind of perusing and they said you know, don't get hurt that was her only as their only instruction do not get hurt. And I go and find a big pile of these bricks and I start playing with them. And I realized that they're magnets. Now these magnets were so strong to this day, I actually still have a piece of one of the magnets inside of my closet, just because you don't see these anymore. But these magnets are so strong. They were alnico magnets, they looked like bricks. And I don't remember what they were out of. I probably asked my dad and and he certainly would know. But they snap together so quickly that when I was playing with them, because you know, I know my kids nowadays have these magnet tiles and they're easy connectors. And it's cool because I use magnets every day at work. But these were the original magnet tiles and they were about 15-20 pounds each and when the two of these magnets got so close, you could almost have things flattened themselves and I got my the tip of my finger caught in it. And I remember immediately caused a blood blister and I realized how strong magnets could be and it really gives you a look into things like MRI machines where you have magnets all around those MRI machines. And that's how they're able to get powered and really work and use kind of you see it in person with these magnets. And I clearly remember it because I believe that once I put my foot or excuse me, I put my finger and I got the blood blister when I moved, there was a broken palette that I backed it out, stepped on it. So I was wearing sneakers because we were just visiting. And I put a nail through my foot simultaneously. So within one fell swoop, I had a blood blister a nail through my foot, and my mom was yelling at me because I was not supposed to be browsing around with anyone else around. So it was just something that I remember and it might be a story that you can relate to also. Third story I want to talk about is the original scales and how my dad always taught me how important the scales were. And we used to have the old Mettler Toledo scales, we had two different ones, we had a traditional one that you could push had four wheels on it, you would take the little weights and you could move them on the end. And you can make the scale go anywhere from 25 pounds up to 1000 pounds, I believe it was, and my dad always showed me how important having these different weights were where to put them on. By weighing one side of the scale how you were able to balance things in a different way. Where today we just take it you know, we take for granted these digital scales, whether they're digital truck scales, or four by four or five by five, six by six floor scales. You take it you know, you really take for granted how these are so easy to use, plug and play. With those old Mettler Toledo, then we had another tall one that was out of I believe a Shoprite or old grocery store, it was about eight foot tall, it was about 12 inches off of the ground. And we always took the three steel racks that we had on a dolly and we were able to slide them up and onto the scale. So we could know you know what the aluminum siding or whatever material it was on top. We knew what it weighed. And it was just so funny because I just remember so vividly these moments. And it wasn't for a few years, probably until I was a teenager in the in the late 90s where we really graduated from those old traditional scales to digital scales. And it really changed everything. It made it so customers were a little more clear on what was going on. It made it so we didn't have to see when the needle was going to stop. Many of you remember those needles bouncing back and forth, and where it was going to end and how much weight you had. And of course, the handwritten receipts, how things have changed all the way here into you know, 2021 and beyond. But these are just a few scrap stories we wanted to share. See what you thought see if you had any other stories that you want us to talk about or ideas that you have, or stories that you'd like to share with us and we could do a podcast alongside you Now, don't forget if you want us to make more content that's going to help you learn more about materials. make more money with your scrap, please become Patreon supporter today. With s many advantages of marke updates, special videos and new alerts throughout the week i the month. Becoming a Patreo supporter really is going t help you learn about the scra markets from the perspective o a scrap yard owner, from t e perspective of someone in t e industry for many years, a d knowing just so many differe t things. Scrapppers, this is To from the iScrap App, we thank you for following us throug out the later podcast. Make s re you leave us a review and un il next time, I'll scrap you la er. Thanks for listening to this week's episode. If you're looking for more scrap metal news, you can always go to iscrapapp.com or download the iScrap App today. With push notifications giving you free price alerts, you'll always know what's going on with the scrap metal market. If you're looking to get deeper into the scrap world you can become a Patreon supporter but you'll have more information pushed you every day and throughout the week. Have a good day. Scrap You Later.